Georgia

  • June 25, 2024

    Judge Stays Food Supplier's Wastewater Suit Against Ga. City

    A Georgia federal judge on Monday agreed to stay a lawsuit in which a food supplier alleged the city of Dawsonville, Georgia, and seven city officials threatened to shut off water and sewage service to its poultry plant based on $1.5 million in illegally assessed wastewater discharge penalties.

  • June 24, 2024

    Willis' Plan To Prejudice Defendants Requires DQ, Trump Says

    Former President Donald Trump told the Georgia Court of Appeals on Monday that a trial court judge inaccurately applied the legal standard for forensic misconduct when he ruled that Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis could continue her prosecution of him and his co-defendants in the Georgia presidential election interference case.

  • June 24, 2024

    Atty Says Arrested Ga. Judge Will Be 'Completely Exonerated'

    In the aftermath of the arrest of an embattled Georgia probate judge outside an Atlanta nightclub last week, the defense attorney for Judge Christina Peterson said on Friday that she was "simply trying to be a good Samaritan" and that he expects his client will be "completely exonerated."

  • June 24, 2024

    Red Roof Ignored Years Of Trafficking, Victim Tells Ga. Jurors

    The corporate owners of two metro Atlanta Red Roof Inn locations knew about and ignored trafficking at the hotels, a woman who said she had been trafficked at the two hotels and others in the surrounding area for six years told Georgia federal jurors Monday.

  • June 24, 2024

    Julie Chrisley To Be Resentenced, But Convictions Stand

    The Eleventh Circuit on Friday upheld the tax evasion and fraud convictions of former reality TV stars Todd and Julie Chrisley, but ordered a Georgia federal judge to resentence Julie Chrisley after finding that the judge failed to fully explore her discrete role in the $36 million scheme.

  • June 24, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    Amendments to Delaware's General Corporation Law topped the news out of the Court of Chancery again last week, as the hotly contested measure sailed through the state's legislature. Tesla and its shareholders continued their tug-of-war over attorney fees for Chancery litigation about Elon Musk's pay package, and new cases were filed involving biotechs, car rental companies, workout platforms, telecom towers, and a cargo ship fire in Brazil.

  • June 24, 2024

    Justices Send 3 US Trustee Fee Cases Back To Lower Courts

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday vacated three appellate court decisions ordering refunds to debtors who had overpaid U.S. Trustee's Office fees under a previous fee structure and remanded the cases for further adjudication after resolving the issue earlier this month.

  • June 24, 2024

    Justices To Assess Reach Of ADA To Ex-Workers' Benefit Suits

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday accepted a retired Florida firefighter's request that it decide whether former employees can lodge discrimination suits under the Americans with Disabilities Act related to post-employment benefits.

  • June 21, 2024

    Real Estate Recap: Distressed Deals, Housing Hurdles, Infill

    Catch up on this week's key state developments from Law360 Real Estate Authority — including tips for guiding distressed office deals, the latest intel from Harvard University's Joint Center for Housing Studies, and how one U.S. city has been a magnet for federal funding of brownfield projects.

  • June 21, 2024

    Ga. Panel Revives Cow Car Crash Suit

    A woman who lost an arm after her vehicle hit a cow's body, causing her car to flip over, will get another shot at suing the truck driver who first struck and disabled the bovine on the roadway, a Georgia appeals court ruled Friday, saying a trial is needed to determine if the trucker could have warned others about the obstruction.

  • June 21, 2024

    11th Circ. Backs Fla. Agency Win In Ex-Warden's FMLA Suit

    The Eleventh Circuit refused Friday to reinstate a former warden's lawsuit accusing the Florida Department of Corrections of transferring and demoting her because she was nearing 60 and took six months of leave, saying she failed to connect the dots to show the agency was motivated by bias.

  • June 21, 2024

    Ga. Panel Orders New Trial In $2M Case Over Car Accident

    The Georgia Court of Appeals on Friday reversed a judgment, vacated an attorney fee award and ordered a new trial in a case in which a jury awarded a man $2 million in damages after he was rear-ended while heading home from work in 2018.

  • June 21, 2024

    Billing Report Order Was 'Overly Broad' In Injury Suit, Panel Says

    A Georgia appeals court on Friday vacated a trial court order requiring a medical provider and its claims manager to produce a database report with financial and billing information during discovery in a car accident case, saying the order was overly broad and didn't do enough to protect the companies' confidential information.

  • June 21, 2024

    Wrong Address Dooms Removal Relief Bid, 11th Circ. Finds

    The Eleventh Circuit won't reverse the long-ago removal in absentia of a Honduran woman who missed her removal hearing, citing the Board of Immigration Appeals' finding that she'd provided an inaccurate address to receive notice of the hearing.

  • June 21, 2024

    11th Circ. Rules Hotel Operator Liable For Wages As Employer

    A hotel operator exercised enough control over a front desk worker to be his employer and is therefore liable for minimum wage and overtime, the Eleventh Circuit ruled, also noting that a lower court erred in calculating the damages.

  • June 21, 2024

    Settlement Ends Amazon Warehouse Construction Fight

    A settlement has resolved a dispute between an electric subcontractor and a construction company over the delayed building of an Amazon warehouse in south Georgia, according to a joint motion to dismiss filed Thursday in federal court.

  • June 21, 2024

    Feds Seek To Nix Atty's Charges As 2nd Atty Heads To Prison

    Prosecutors moved Friday to dismiss charges against a Georgia attorney for fraudulently obtaining federal pandemic-relief loans meant for businesses, with the pending dismissal — based on her completion of a pretrial diversion program — coming after a Florida attorney and alleged accomplice received a prison sentence of more than six years.

  • June 21, 2024

    Ga. Appeals Seat Winner Aims To Nix Election Challenge

    The winner of a Georgia appeals court seat says his opponent does not have any proof to support her allegations of his residency discrepancies and her motion to reverse the election should be dismissed.

  • June 21, 2024

    'Clearly Relevant' Fraud Claims Stay In Lin Wood Slander Trial

    Ahead of a trial where controversial attorney Lin Wood will face claims that he defamed his former law partners, a Georgia federal judge on Friday refused to keep out as evidence two state court lawsuits in which Wood is accused of stiffing them on legal fees and sheltering cash behind a real estate venture.

  • June 21, 2024

    Justices Strengthen Jury Trial Rights For Stiffer Sentences

    The constitutional rights to due process and trial by jury extend to a pivotal prong of a prominent sentencing enhancement for recidivism, the U.S. Supreme Court held in a Friday decision that casts doubt on many incarcerations and promises to reshape future trials.

  • June 20, 2024

    Logistics Cos. Face Skilled Worker Visa Misuse Class Action

    A pair of logistics companies in the United States face a proposed worker class action alleging they misled prospective employees in Mexico about purported engineering roles that, in reality, were menial labor.

  • June 20, 2024

    11th Circ. Upholds $2.5M Pelvic Mesh Verdict, Rules Suit Timely

    The Eleventh Circuit on Thursday refused to throw out a woman's $2.5 million victory against Coloplast Corp. in a suit alleging she was implanted with defective pelvic mesh, saying the evidence does not support a conclusion that her claim was filed too late.

  • June 20, 2024

    Ga. Jury Awards $2.35M To Victim Of Sig Sauer Misfire

    A Georgia federal jury awarded over $2.35 million Thursday to a man who was shot when his Sig Sauer handgun accidentally fired in its holster, finding the company was negligent when it failed to put a trigger-mounted safety on its popular P320 pistol.

  • June 20, 2024

    Athletes Want Advocates Kept Out Of NCAA Trans Policy Fight

    A group of female college athletes sought to keep the National Women's Law Center out of its transgender policy dispute with the NCAA, slamming the advocacy organization in Georgia federal court on Wednesday for its attack on the plaintiffs' "legitimate views on biology." 

  • June 20, 2024

    11th Circ. Nixes J&J Sunscreen Benzene MDL Settlement

    The Eleventh Circuit on Thursday vacated an order granting approval to a settlement resolving claims that Johnson & Johnson sold sunscreens containing benzene, saying a pair of circuit court decisions since the approval mean the deal needs another look.

Expert Analysis

  • After A Brief Hiccup, The 'Rocket Docket' Soars Back To No. 1

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    The Eastern District of Virginia’s precipitous 2022 fall from its storied rocket docket status appears to have been a temporary aberration, as recent statistics reveal that the court is once again back on top as the fastest federal civil trial court in the nation, says Robert Tata at Hunton.

  • Recruitment Trends In Emerging Law Firm Frontiers

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    BigLaw firms are facing local recruitment challenges as they increasingly establish offices in cities outside of the major legal hubs, requiring them to weigh various strategies for attracting talent that present different risks and benefits, says Tom Hanlon at Buchanan Law.

  • Series

    Glassblowing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    I never expected that glassblowing would strongly influence my work as an attorney, but it has taught me the importance of building a solid foundation for your work, learning from others and committing to a lifetime of practice, says Margaret House at Kalijarvi Chuzi.

  • What 11th Circ. Fearless Fund Ruling Means For DEI In Courts

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    The Eleventh Circuit's recent backing of a freeze on the Fearless Fund's grants to women of color building new companies marks the latest major development in litigation related to diversity, equity and inclusion and may be used to question other DEI programs targeted at providing opportunities to certain classes of individuals, say attorneys at Simpson Thacher.

  • How Associates Can Build A Professional Image

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    As hybrid work arrangements become the norm in the legal industry, early-career attorneys must be proactive in building and maintaining a professional presence in both physical and digital settings, ensuring that their image aligns with their long-term career goals, say Lana Manganiello at Equinox Strategy Partners and Estelle Winsett at Estelle Winsett Professional Image Consulting.

  • Firms Must Rethink How They Train New Lawyers In AI Age

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    As law firms begin to use generative artificial intelligence to complete lower-level legal tasks, they’ll need to consider new ways to train summer associates and early-career attorneys, keeping in mind the five stages of skill acquisition, says Liisa Thomas at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Think Like A Lawyer: Always Be Closing

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    When a lawyer presents their case with the right propulsive structure throughout trial, there is little need for further argument after the close of evidence — and in fact, rehashing it all may test jurors’ patience — so attorneys should consider other strategies for closing arguments, says Luke Andrews at Poole Huffman.

  • Deciphering SEC Disgorgement 4 Years After Liu

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    Since the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2020 decision in Liu v. U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission to preserve SEC disgorgement with limits, courts have continued to rule largely in the agency’s favor, but a recent circuit split over the National Defense Authorization Act's import may create hurdles for the SEC, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • Where Anti-Discrimination Law Stands 4 Years After Bostock

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    On the fourth anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court's landmark Bostock ruling, Evan Parness and Abby Rickeman at Covington take stock of how the decision, which held that Title VII protects employees from discrimination because of their sexual orientation and gender identity, has affected anti-discrimination law at the state and federal levels.

  • Series

    Playing Chess Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    There are many ways that chess skills translate directly into lawyer skills, but for me, the bigger career lessons go beyond the direct parallels — playing chess has shown me the value of seeing gradual improvement in and focusing deep concentration on a nonwork endeavor, says attorney Steven Fink.

  • Litigation Inspiration: Attys Can Be Heroic Like Olympians

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    Although litigation won’t earn anyone an Olympic medal in Paris this summer, it can be worthy of the same lasting honor if attorneys exercise focused restraint — seeking both their clients’ interests and those of the court — instead of merely pursuing every advantage short of sanctionable conduct, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • Lean Into The 'Great Restoration' To Retain Legal Talent

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    As the “great resignation,” in which employees voluntarily left their jobs in droves, has largely dissipated, legal employers should now work toward the idea of a “great restoration,” adopting strategies to effectively hire, onboard and retain top legal talent, says Molly McGrath at Hiring & Empowering Solutions.

  • 9th Circ. Ruling Shows Lies Must Go To Nature Of Bargain

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    The Ninth Circuit’s recent U.S. v. Milheiser decision, vacating six mail fraud convictions, clarifies that the key question in federal fraud cases is not whether lies were told, but what they were told about — thus requiring defense counsel to rethink their strategies, say Charles Kreindler and Krista Landis at Sheppard Mullin.

  • The Uncertain Scope Of The First Financial Fair Access Laws

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    With Florida and Tennessee soon to roll out laws banning financial institutions from making decisions based on customer traits like political affiliation, national financial services providers should consider how broadly worded “fair access” laws from these and other conservative-leaning states may place new obligations on their business operations, say attorneys at Sullivan & Cromwell.

  • Why Jurors Balk At 'I Don't Recall' — And How To Respond

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    Jurors often react negatively to a witness who responds “I don’t remember” because they tend to hold erroneous beliefs about the nature of human memory, but attorneys can adopt a few strategies to mitigate the impact of these biases, say Steve Wood and Ava Hernández at Courtroom Sciences.

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