Labor

  • June 25, 2024

    Wynn Casino Can't Undo Rehiring Of Worker Fired For Slur

    Wynn Resort's Encore Boston Harbor Casino has lost its effort to overturn an arbitrator's decision to reinstate and issue back pay to a call center reservation worker it fired for allegedly calling a Black colleague a racial slur.

  • June 24, 2024

    Ex-Philly Union Head Denied Acquittal On Embezzlement

    A Pennsylvania federal judge has declined to throw out the conviction of John Dougherty, the former business manager of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 98, on charges that he stole money from the union to pay for repairs to his home and others' properties.

  • June 24, 2024

    Minn. AG Says Biz Groups Can't Topple Captive Meetings Law

    The Minnesota attorney general and other state officials fought off claims from a company and two business groups against a law barring employers from disciplining workers who don't want to listen to so-called captive audience meetings, arguing there isn't an enforcement threat.

  • June 24, 2024

    Teamsters Fund Must Face Pension Conversion Suit

    A West Coast-based Teamsters pension fund must keep facing claims that it shortchanged married retirees by using outdated data to convert their benefits from single-life annuity form, with a Washington federal judge deeming the suit strong enough to beat the fund's dismissal motion.

  • June 24, 2024

    Judge Blocks Part Of DOL Construction Prevailing Wage Rule

    A Texas federal judge on Monday blocked parts of a U.S. Department of Labor rule changing how prevailing wages are determined for federally funded construction projects from going into effect, saying the department had overstepped its authority under the Davis-Bacon Act.

  • June 24, 2024

    Junior Leaguers Are Offsides On Antitrust Claims, NHL Says

    The NHL is looking to squash a putative antitrust class action from players in its developmental leagues alleging exploitation and abuse, telling a New York federal court that such disputes over pay and work conditions fall under the league's collective bargaining agreement and are shielded from antitrust scrutiny.

  • June 24, 2024

    NLRB Fights Longshore Union's Work Spat At 9th Circ.

    The National Labor Relations Board defended its decision finding a longshore union unlawfully continued to fight jurisdiction over maintenance work in the Port of Seattle that was awarded to the Machinists, telling the Ninth Circuit that this isn't a work preservation dispute.

  • June 24, 2024

    Amazon CEO's Comments Broke Labor Law, NLRB Attys Say

    The Amazon CEO's decision to state publicly that unionization could damage workers' direct relationship with managers should land the company on the hook for a labor law violation, National Labor Relations Board prosecutors told the board, arguing for a change in precedent on such statements.

  • June 24, 2024

    Justices To Assess Reach Of ADA To Ex-Workers' Benefit Suits

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday accepted a retired Florida firefighter's request that it decide whether former employees can lodge discrimination suits under the Americans with Disabilities Act related to post-employment benefits.

  • June 21, 2024

    DOL Says Union's Farm Wage Challenge Too Late

    The U.S. Department of Labor has pushed back against a challenge to rules introduced in 2022 that a Washington union said are depressing farmworkers' wages, telling a federal judge Friday that the union should have objected during the rule-making period.

  • June 21, 2024

    NY Judge Says Feds, MTA Fully Vetted Congestion Pricing

    A Manhattan federal judge has said federal and New York transportation agencies meticulously analyzed congestion pricing's potential impacts on traffic, air quality and other factors, rejecting local residents and community groups' claims that the Big Apple's now-paused congestion pricing was improperly approved.

  • June 21, 2024

    NCAA Says Hoops Union Order Creates 'Destructive' Division

    A National Labor Relations Board regional director's decision finding men's basketball players at Dartmouth College are employees under federal labor law pits students against each other, the NCAA argued, urging the board not to assert jurisdiction over student-athletes.

  • June 21, 2024

    Union Tells 1st Circ. It's Fit To Bring Debt Cap Challenge

    A U.S. government workers' union challenging the constitutionality of the debt ceiling urged the First Circuit to ignore the Biden administration's argument that union members couldn't explain how it harms them, saying it's reasonable to expect their paychecks will be suspended when it is reimposed.

  • June 21, 2024

    Teamsters Say Calif. Pot Shop's Deal Was With 'Sham' Union

    The International Brotherhood of Teamsters is asking to intervene as a defendant in a cannabis retailer's suit challenging the constitutionality of California's requirement that the retailer enter a labor peace agreement with a "bona fide" labor organization, saying the union the shop contracted is a sham that does nothing to organize workers.

  • June 21, 2024

    NY Forecast: 2nd Circ. Weighs Construction Workers' OT Suit

    This week, the Second Circuit will consider a group of construction workers' attempt to revive a proposed class and collective action claiming a group of construction companies failed to pay them overtime required under state and federal law. Here, Law360 explores this and other cases on the docket in New York.

  • June 21, 2024

    Mount Sinai's Doctor Pacts Violate Labor Law, NLRB GC Says

    New York's Mount Sinai Health System has illegally required part-time physicians to sign employment agreements with provisions that infringe on workers' rights, National Labor Relations Board prosecutors alleged, and the agency is seeking financial damages for affected employees.

  • June 21, 2024

    Calif. Forecast: Concentra Fights Cert. Of 350K Job Seekers

    In the coming week, attorneys should keep an eye out for potential class certification and expert disqualification in a suit against Concentra regarding medical inquiries for job applicants. Here's a look at that case and other labor and employment matters on deck in California.

  • June 20, 2024

    Charter Axed Teacher Over Breakdown, NLRB Judge Says

    A National Labor Relations Board judge cleared an Ohio charter school Thursday of claims that it fired a teacher for supporting a union drive, saying the evidence shows it fired her for telling a principal she wanted to "murder" her students after they disrupted her lessons.

  • June 20, 2024

    Marathon Has To Arbitrate Subcontracting Row, 9th Circ. Says

    A Ninth Circuit panel on Thursday supported a lower court's decision to make Marathon Petroleum arbitrate a union's grievance over subcontracting under a project labor agreement, saying the company can't use its role as an owner in the accord to avoid arbitration.

  • June 20, 2024

    Honda Illegally Directed UAW Sticker Removal, NLRB GC Says

    Honda violated federal labor law by telling employees to remove United Auto Workers stickers from their safety helmets and committed other unfair labor practices, National Labor Relations Board prosecutors alleged in an unfair labor practice complaint.

  • June 20, 2024

    NLRB Attys, Calif. Tribe Settle Casino Subpoena Dispute

    A California federal court dismissed on Thursday National Labor Relations Board prosecutors' bids to enforce subpoenas requesting a list of casino employees who could be in a proposed bargaining unit from a tribe and a gambling company, with agency attorneys saying the parties settled the dispute.

  • June 20, 2024

    FordHarrison Adds Employment Attys In NJ, Nashville

    Employment firm FordHarrison LLP announced that it hired a pair of experienced attorneys as partners in its offices in Nashville, Tennessee, and Berkeley Heights, New Jersey.

  • June 20, 2024

    DLA Piper Adds 2 Entertainment Attys In NY From Reed Smith

    Two entertainment and advertising partners have left Reed Smith LLP to join DLA Piper, including the first woman to serve as the chief negotiator for the Joint Policy Committee, the bargaining representative for the advertising industry in negotiations for the multibillion-dollar commercials collective bargaining agreements with SAG-AFTRA and the American Federation of Musicians.

  • June 18, 2024

    Amazon Caused Seattle Worker To Quit, NLRB GC Says

    Amazon constructively discharged a worker involved in organizing a walkout among employees at its Seattle headquarters over a return-to-office policy, according to a complaint filed by National Labor Relations Board prosecutors, who are seeking an apology letter and a nationwide notice posting from the e-commerce giant.

  • June 18, 2024

    NLRB Can't Fight Subpoenas On Workers' Behalf, Judge Says

    A National Labor Relations Board official can't fight subpoenas that Starbucks issued to employees during an injunction dispute between the company and the agency, a South Carolina federal judge ruled Tuesday, saying the workers aren't parties to the court proceedings and the official can't argue on their behalf.

Expert Analysis

  • Crafting An Effective Workplace AI Policy After DOL Guidance

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    Employers should take proactive steps to minimize their liability risk after the U.S. Department of Labor released artificial intelligence guidance principles on May 16, reflecting the reality that companies must begin putting into place policies that will dictate their expectations for how employees will use AI, say David Disler and Courtnie Bolden at ​​​​​​​Porzio Bromberg.

  • Politics In The Workplace: What Employers Need To Know

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    As the 2024 election approaches and protests continue across the country, employers should be aware of employees' rights — and limits on those rights — related to political speech and activities in the workplace, and be prepared to act proactively to prevent issues before they arise, say attorneys at Littler.

  • Cos. Must Stay On Alert With Joint Employer Rule In Flux

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    While employers may breathe a sigh of relief at recent events blocking the National Labor Relations Board's proposed rule that would make it easier for two entities to be deemed joint employers, the rule is not yet dead, say attorneys at ​​​​​​​Day Pitney.

  • One Contract Fix Can Reduce Employer Lawsuit Exposure

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    A recent Fifth Circuit ruling that saved FedEx over $365 million highlights how a one-sentence limitation provision on an employment application or in an at-will employment agreement may be the easiest cost-savings measure for employers against legal claims, say Sara O'Keefe and William Wortel at BCLP.

  • Water Cooler Talk: Sick Leave Insights From 'Parks And Rec'

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    Tracey Diamond and Evan Gibbs at Troutman Pepper spoke with Lisa Whittaker at the J.M. Smucker Co. about how to effectively manage sick leave policies to ensure legal compliance and fairness to all employees, in a discussion inspired by a "Parks and Recreation" episode.

  • 3 Employer Lessons From NLRB's Complaint Against SpaceX

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    Severance agreements traditionally have included nondisparagement and nondisclosure provisions as a matter of course — but a recent National Labor Relations Board complaint against SpaceX underscores the ongoing efforts to narrow severance agreements at the state and federal levels, say attorneys at Williams & Connolly.

  • Time For Congress To Let Qualified Older Pilots Keep Flying

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    While a previous Law360 guest article affirmed the current law requiring airline pilots to retire at age 65, the facts suggest that the pilots, their unions, the airlines and the flying public will all benefit if Congress allows experienced, medically qualified aviators to stay in the cockpit, say Allen Baker and Bo Ellis at Let Experienced Pilots Fly.

  • Game-Changing Decisions Call For New Rules At The NCAA

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    From a newly formed college players union to coaches transferring at the drop of a hat, the National College Athletic Association needs an overhaul, including federal supervision, says Frank Darras at DarrasLaw.

  • What Makes Unionization In Financial Services Unique

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    Only around 1% of financial services employees are part of a union, but that number is on the rise, presenting both unique opportunities and challenges for the employers and employees that make up a sector typically devoid of union activity, say Amanda Fugazy and Steven Nevolis at Ellenoff Grossman.

  • Assessing Work Rules After NLRB Handbook Ruling

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    The National Labor Relations Board's Stericycle decision last year sparked uncertainty surrounding whether historically acceptable work rules remain lawful — but employers can use a two-step analysis to assess whether to implement a given rule and how to do so in a compliant manner, say attorneys at Seyfarth.

  • A Look At Global Employee Disconnect Laws For US Counsel

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    As countries worldwide adopt employee right to disconnect laws, U.S. in-house counsel at corporations with a global workforce must develop a comprehensive understanding of the laws' legal and cultural implications, ensuring their companies can safeguard employee welfare while maintaining legal compliance, say Emma Corcoran and Ute Krudewagen at DLA Piper.

  • Employers Beware Of NLRB Changes On Bad Faith Bargaining

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    Recent National Labor Relations Board decisions show a trend of the agency imposing harsher remedies on employers for bad faith bargaining over union contracts, a position upheld in the Ninth Circuit's recent NLRB v. Grill Concepts Services decision, says Daniel Johns at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Practicing Law With Parkinson's Disease

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    This Parkinson’s Awareness Month, Adam Siegler at Greenberg Traurig discusses his experience working as a lawyer with Parkinson’s disease, sharing both lessons on how to cope with a diagnosis and advice for supporting colleagues who live with the disease.