Employment

  • June 25, 2024

    NJ Says Union Skipped Over Black Workers For Job Referrals

    An ironworkers union passed over workers for job assignments solely because they were Black and looked the other way when workers complained they were subjected to racist, sexist and homophobic harassment, the state of New Jersey told a state court.

  • June 25, 2024

    Wynn Casino Can't Undo Rehiring Of Worker Fired For Slur

    Wynn Resort's Encore Boston Harbor Casino has lost its effort to overturn an arbitrator's decision to reinstate and issue back pay to a call center reservation worker it fired for allegedly calling a Black colleague a racial slur.

  • June 25, 2024

    Ex-DuPont Workers' Age Bias Suit Cleared For Trial

    A Louisiana federal judge refused to grant a win to DuPont in two former employees' suit alleging they were fired because they were in their 40s and 50s, saying a jury should determine whether age bias or safety violations caused their terminations.

  • June 25, 2024

    Oracle Can Seek PAGA Arbitration, Calif. Panel Says

    A California appellate panel said Oracle could compel two workers' 7-year-old individual Private Attorneys General Act wage claims into arbitration, holding that the arbitration agreements couldn't have been enforced until after the U.S. Supreme Court issued the Viking ruling in 2022.

  • June 24, 2024

    UFC Fighters Swing Again To Get OK On $335M Wage Deal

    UFC fighters seeking preliminary approval for their $335 million deal to end class claims that the mixed martial arts organization suppressed their wages submitted a revised distribution plan Monday, after a Nevada federal judge said he wanted to see "life changing" money for fighters who waited through the decadelong litigation.

  • June 24, 2024

    Ex-Philly Union Head Denied Acquittal On Embezzlement

    A Pennsylvania federal judge has declined to throw out the conviction of John Dougherty, the former business manager of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 98, on charges that he stole money from the union to pay for repairs to his home and others' properties.

  • June 24, 2024

    Split 4th Circ. Panel Reopens DEA Applicant's Retaliation Suit

    The Fourth Circuit reinstated a lawsuit Monday accusing the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration of pulling a job offer after it learned the applicant had participated in a sexual harassment suit against the FBI, saying a trial court held the would-be special agent to too high of a standard.

  • June 24, 2024

    Radio Host Says Politics Behind 'All Lives Matter' Tweet Firing

    A former radio announcer for the Sacramento Kings is forging ahead with his wrongful termination suit in California federal court, emphasizing that broadcaster Bonneville International Corp.'s decision to fire him after he tweeted "All Lives Matter" following the 2020 murder of George Floyd was politically motivated.

  • June 24, 2024

    Health Co. Narrows Doctor's Reneged Benefits Suit

    An Arizona federal judge trimmed a doctor's suit claiming her healthcare system employer refused to let her use her benefits to take time off to undergo cancer treatments, but kept alive claims that the company violated state and federal law by misleading her about paid leave.

  • June 24, 2024

    Teamsters Fund Must Face Pension Conversion Suit

    A West Coast-based Teamsters pension fund must keep facing claims that it shortchanged married retirees by using outdated data to convert their benefits from single-life annuity form, with a Washington federal judge deeming the suit strong enough to beat the fund's dismissal motion.

  • June 24, 2024

    6th Circ. Backs University's Win In ADA Bias, Retaliation Suit

    The Sixth Circuit refused Monday to revive a former Western Michigan University employee's lawsuit claiming he was fired for requesting accommodations for his attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, ruling Congress didn't have the power to eliminate states' immunity from retaliation claims under federal disability law.

  • June 24, 2024

    LA Schools Says Pseudoscience Infected 9th Circ. Vax Ruling

    The Los Angeles Unified School District said Friday that a split Ninth Circuit panel leaned on pseudoscience when ruling that a rescinded employee COVID-19 vaccination mandate implicated the right of district employees to refuse medical treatment, urging an en banc panel to correct the "fatally flawed" decision.

  • June 24, 2024

    NC Life Insurer Slaps Ex-Agents With Poaching Suit

    North Carolina-based life insurance company Equis Financial LLC accused nine former independent contractors who sold policies for the insurer of breaching their employment agreements when they left to work for a rival insurance marketing company.

  • June 24, 2024

    8th Circ. Sides With Minn. DOT In Injured Worker's ADA Suit

    The Eighth Circuit on Monday backed the Minnesota Department of Transportation in a suit by a former mechanic who alleged the agency discriminated against him after an on-the-job injury, finding MNDOT reasonably showed that he could not do the work of his prior position.

  • June 24, 2024

    Judge Blocks Part Of DOL Construction Prevailing Wage Rule

    A Texas federal judge on Monday blocked parts of a U.S. Department of Labor rule changing how prevailing wages are determined for federally funded construction projects from going into effect, saying the department had overstepped its authority under the Davis-Bacon Act.

  • June 24, 2024

    9th Circ. Asks Wash. Justices If Uber Had Duty To Slain Driver

    The Ninth Circuit urged Washington's highest court Monday to determine whether Uber had a duty to use reasonable care to protect one of its drivers who was murdered in a carjacking, in an order that paused an appeal brought by the driver's family.

  • June 24, 2024

    9th Circ. Won't Revive Ex-Uber Driver's Bias Suit

    An Asian man who previously drove for Uber didn't provide enough information in his proposed class action to support his claim that the ride-hailing platform's use of customer ratings when making decisions to drop drivers had a "significant disparate impact" on non-white drivers, the Ninth Circuit said Monday.

  • June 24, 2024

    Wage Law Doesn't Apply To $32M In PPE Sales, NJ Panel Says

    An employee who sold more than $32 million in personal protective equipment during three months of the COVID-19 pandemic is not entitled to $1.3 million in commissions under the New Jersey Wage Payment Law, because the sales did not fall under her normal role and are instead "supplementary incentives," a state appeals panel ruled Monday.

  • June 24, 2024

    Tax Preparers Win Recommendation For Class Cert. In OT Suit

    A group of tax preparers have met the requirements to form a class in a suit accusing their former employer of failing to pay overtime, a New York federal magistrate judge said, rejecting the employer's argument that their request for class status came too late.

  • June 24, 2024

    DC Circ. Backs Gov't Contractor Win In Fight With Ex-Worker

    The D.C. Circuit has backed a ruling that a former senior technical manager for government contractor Apprio Inc. breached a proprietary information agreement giving the rights of certain software he created over to the company.

  • June 24, 2024

    EEOC Approves US Marshals' $15M Deal In Race Bias Case

    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission gave final approval to a $15 million settlement resolving claims that the U.S. Marshals Service systematically discriminated against hundreds of Black employees who sought promotions or special assignments, class representatives said Monday, ending the decades-old race bias case.

  • June 24, 2024

    Ex-NJ Corrections Official Can't Revive Demotion Bias Suit

    A New Jersey state appellate court on Monday refused to reinstate a lawsuit against the state's Department of Corrections alleging it demoted a former deputy commissioner because she was in her 60s and underwent a hip replacement, saying the agency's commissioner was free to make personnel decisions.

  • June 24, 2024

    Seyfarth Atty Dropped From Yeshiva U. Rape Cover-Up Suit

    A female Yeshiva University student who claims she was raped by a player on the men's basketball team, then sued the school claiming it conspired on a cover-up with Seyfarth Shaw LLP, has voluntarily dismissed two Yeshiva officials and a Seyfarth attorney from the lawsuit.

  • June 24, 2024

    Junior Leaguers Are Offsides On Antitrust Claims, NHL Says

    The NHL is looking to squash a putative antitrust class action from players in its developmental leagues alleging exploitation and abuse, telling a New York federal court that such disputes over pay and work conditions fall under the league's collective bargaining agreement and are shielded from antitrust scrutiny.

  • June 24, 2024

    No Coverage For $3M Logging Injury Verdict, 4th Circ. Affirms

    The Fourth Circuit has affirmed that an insurer doesn't have to cover a $3 million jury verdict over a man's logging injuries, finding that a North Carolina federal court correctly decided that a broad worker injury exclusion was applicable.

Expert Analysis

  • After A Brief Hiccup, The 'Rocket Docket' Soars Back To No. 1

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    The Eastern District of Virginia’s precipitous 2022 fall from its storied rocket docket status appears to have been a temporary aberration, as recent statistics reveal that the court is once again back on top as the fastest federal civil trial court in the nation, says Robert Tata at Hunton.

  • Addressing Labor Shortages In The Construction Industry

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    As the construction industry's ongoing struggle with finding sufficient skilled workers continues, companies should consider a range of solutions including a commitment to in-house training and creative contracting protocols, say Brenda Radmacher and Allison Etkin at Akerman.

  • Tailoring Compliance Before AI Walks The Runway

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    Fashion industry players that adopt artificial intelligence to propel their businesses forward should consider ways to minimize its perceived downsides, including potential job displacements and algorithmic biases that may harm diversity, equity and inclusion efforts, say Jeffrey Greene and Ivory Djahouri at Foley & Lardner.

  • Recruitment Trends In Emerging Law Firm Frontiers

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    BigLaw firms are facing local recruitment challenges as they increasingly establish offices in cities outside of the major legal hubs, requiring them to weigh various strategies for attracting talent that present different risks and benefits, says Tom Hanlon at Buchanan Law.

  • Series

    Glassblowing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    I never expected that glassblowing would strongly influence my work as an attorney, but it has taught me the importance of building a solid foundation for your work, learning from others and committing to a lifetime of practice, says Margaret House at Kalijarvi Chuzi.

  • 3 Surprising Deposition Dangers Attorneys Must Heed

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    Attorneys often do not think of discovery as a particularly risky phase of litigation, but counsel must closely heed some surprisingly strict and frequently overlooked requirements before, during and after depositions that can lead to draconian consequences, says Nate Sabri at Perkins Coie.

  • What Employers Need To Know About Colorado's New AI Law

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    The Colorado AI Act, enacted in May and intended to regulate the use of high-risk artificial intelligence systems to prevent algorithmic discrimination, is broad in scope and will apply to businesses using AI for certain employment purposes, imposing numerous compliance obligations and potential liability, say Laura Malugade and Owen Davis at Husch Blackwell.

  • Opinion

    Paid Noncompetes Offer A Better Solution Than FTC's Ban

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    A better alternative to the Federal Trade Commission's recent and widely contested noncompete ban would be a nationwide bright-line rule requiring employers to pay employees during the noncompete period, says Steven Kayman at Rottenberg Lipman.

  • How Associates Can Build A Professional Image

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    As hybrid work arrangements become the norm in the legal industry, early-career attorneys must be proactive in building and maintaining a professional presence in both physical and digital settings, ensuring that their image aligns with their long-term career goals, say Lana Manganiello at Equinox Strategy Partners and Estelle Winsett at Estelle Winsett Professional Image Consulting.

  • Firms Must Rethink How They Train New Lawyers In AI Age

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    As law firms begin to use generative artificial intelligence to complete lower-level legal tasks, they’ll need to consider new ways to train summer associates and early-career attorneys, keeping in mind the five stages of skill acquisition, says Liisa Thomas at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Think Like A Lawyer: Always Be Closing

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    When a lawyer presents their case with the right propulsive structure throughout trial, there is little need for further argument after the close of evidence — and in fact, rehashing it all may test jurors’ patience — so attorneys should consider other strategies for closing arguments, says Luke Andrews at Poole Huffman.

  • Where Anti-Discrimination Law Stands 4 Years After Bostock

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    On the fourth anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court's landmark Bostock ruling, Evan Parness and Abby Rickeman at Covington take stock of how the decision, which held that Title VII protects employees from discrimination because of their sexual orientation and gender identity, has affected anti-discrimination law at the state and federal levels.

  • Series

    Playing Chess Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    There are many ways that chess skills translate directly into lawyer skills, but for me, the bigger career lessons go beyond the direct parallels — playing chess has shown me the value of seeing gradual improvement in and focusing deep concentration on a nonwork endeavor, says attorney Steven Fink.

  • Crafting An Effective Workplace AI Policy After DOL Guidance

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    Employers should take proactive steps to minimize their liability risk after the U.S. Department of Labor released artificial intelligence guidance principles on May 16, reflecting the reality that companies must begin putting into place policies that will dictate their expectations for how employees will use AI, say David Disler and Courtnie Bolden at ​​​​​​​Porzio Bromberg.

  • Patent Lessons From 7 Federal Circuit Reversals In May

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    A look at recent cases where the Federal Circuit reversed or vacated decisions by the Patent Trial and Appeal Board or a federal district court provide guidance on how to succeed on appeal by clarifying the obviousness analysis of design patents, the finality of a judgment, and more, say Denise De Mory and Li Guo at Bunsow De Mory.

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